Yakishime Vase No. 08

by Michikazu Sakai

Studying at Okayama Prefecture Bizen Ceramic Center, Michikazu Sakai became fascinated with primeval techniques of firing earth. After meeting his wife Tomoko, the two set out to establish their own modern take on ancient ceramic practices. 

This one-of-a-kind vessel is fired using a technique known as Yakishime. This ancient process which dates back to the 4th century is a mainstay in the art of Japanese pottery. Each vase which is made by hand, enters the kiln unglazed, and is fired for 7 days straight (day and night). The kiln's temperature increases over time and gets high as 1,300 degrees celsius. The consequential pigments and surface markings are the result of fire, ash and the drama between heat and earth inside the kiln.

No two forms are the same and dimensions may vary.

Yakishime Vase No. 08

by Michikazu Sakai

Studying at Okayama Prefecture Bizen Ceramic Center, Michikazu Sakai became fascinated with primeval techniques of firing earth. After meeting his wife Tomoko, the two set out to establish their own modern take on ancient ceramic practices. 

This one-of-a-kind vessel is fired using a technique known as Yakishime. This ancient process which dates back to the 4th century is a mainstay in the art of Japanese pottery. Each vase which is made by hand, enters the kiln unglazed, and is fired for 7 days straight (day and night). The kiln's temperature increases over time and gets high as 1,300 degrees celsius. The consequential pigments and surface markings are the result of fire, ash and the drama between heat and earth inside the kiln.

No two forms are the same and dimensions may vary.

  • Item Dimensions
    D 3.5" x H 4.75"
  • Country Of Origin
    Japan
  • International Shipping
    THIS OBJECT REQUIRES SPECIALIZED SHIPPING. A MEMBER OF OUR TEAM WILL CONTACT YOU UPON PURCHASE TO MAKE ARRANGEMENTS.

Yakishime Vase No. 08

230 USD
  • Select Style
  • 1
  • 2

About Michikazu Sakai

Raised surrounded by pottery, Michikazu Sakai, native of Suaka, Nagno, was not initially interested in ceramics. The art form captured his attention in high school. Michikazu went on to graduate from Okayama Prefecture Bizen Ceramic Center where he met his wife, Tomoko (also a Guild artisan). He creates ceramics in a wide variety of styles including OribeKohiki, and Yakishime. His works are fired in a wood burning kiln, each is full of character and intended for everyday use.