Curved Champagne Glass

by Deborah Ehrlich

Deborah’s first glassware design was a stemless champagne flute in the late 90s.  Initially intended for her own private use and inspired by the ones she had seen and used in France.  Her design took off like wildfire and we’re happy she’s sharing her work with the rest of us. We absolutely love this curved variation, it’s proportion unlocks a beautiful ringing sound - perfect to ring in your next celebration.  Designed in her Hudson Valley 18th century stone farmhouse and hand-blown, cut and polished in Sweden by a master craftsman using a non-lead crystal that can be blown thinner, look more delicate and is stronger than traditional glass.  

Curved Champagne Glass

by Deborah Ehrlich

Deborah’s first glassware design was a stemless champagne flute in the late 90s.  Initially intended for her own private use and inspired by the ones she had seen and used in France.  Her design took off like wildfire and we’re happy she’s sharing her work with the rest of us. We absolutely love this curved variation, it’s proportion unlocks a beautiful ringing sound - perfect to ring in your next celebration.  Designed in her Hudson Valley 18th century stone farmhouse and hand-blown, cut and polished in Sweden by a master craftsman using a non-lead crystal that can be blown thinner, look more delicate and is stronger than traditional glass.  

  • Item Dimensions
    1.9" W x 5.9" H
  • Country Of Origin
    SWEDEN
  • Shipping
    If in stock, ships in 2 business days

Curved Champagne Glass

100 USD

About Deborah Ehrlich

From Passaic, New Jersey to around the world and back, Deborah Ehrlich has an eye for perfecting delicate strength.  Her works with crystal, light, and wood exemplify the grandeur of simplicity.  Now based in the Hudson Valley, her tools include plain white tracing paper, sharp pencils and a thin metal ruler and her companions include two goats.  “I work very, very slowly...it’s very precise, like marking stars in the sky. There’s an architecture to what I do that’s really about trying to unveil the innate proportion,” says Ehrlich. “I’m looking for a certain silence, a quiet.” With a background in anthropology and sculpture, she moves seamlessly between her glass and wood designs which are manifested by master craftsman she’s cultivated relationships with over the years. 

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